Hospital Cardinale Ascalesi

INTRODUCTION

The Cardinal Ascalesi Hospital was founded in the 1920s in the heart of Forcella, a neighborhood of Naples (Via Egiziaca a Forcella, 31).1

Main entrance

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Complete view of the building

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Visitors entry

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Inner courtyard

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THE ANGIOU DYNASTY IN THE HOSPITAL’S HISTORY

The hospice started life as a monastery. It was part of a larger complex that also included the Church of Santa Maria Egiziaca all'Olmo and it was built towards the middle of the fourteenth century by Queen Sancha of Aragona, wife of Roberto d'Angiò.2 In that period the monastery hosted Augustinian nuns.
Nowadays the church's entrance is located in Corso Umberto I.
The Commune took possession of the structure when ecclesiastical institutions were abolished. Later the structure was left to "Regio ospizio dei Santissimi Pietro e Gennaro extra moenia" in order to create a hospital. The hospice specialized in treating ringworm, a parasitic skin disease.3
The building was completed in the 1930's and the hospital was dedicated to Cardinal Alessio Ascalesi.
Alessio Ascalesi became an archbishop in 1924. He offered support during the construction of the hospice and furthermore he was well-known to have a commitment to civic causes.4

THE INSIDE OF THE HOSPITAL

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THE DEVELOPMENT OF HOSPITAL CLINICS

The Health Department (1st april 1948) reorganized the structure of the hospital. There were clinics for various medical specialties. On the ground floor there were surgery, obstetric, gynecological, orthopedic and neurological clinics.5

INNER STRUCTURE OF THE HOSPICE

The departments had over two hundred beds, located in light and airy rooms. On the first floor, the central part hosted the department of general surgery. In one of the lateral sections there were clinical chemistry labs and in the other one there were two female departments of general surgery.6

  • Photos and main text by Camilla Aceto @ and Mariangela Celeste Portaluri @, (December 2017), courtesy of Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Roma staff

Bibliography

  • Statistica generale sanitaria dell'Ospedale Cardinale Ascalesi di Napoli, Tip. G. Genovese, Napoli 1951, pp. 3-5

Sitography


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